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Dengue fever kills 71 in Sudan epidemic
From health.am

Sudan is battling an epidemic of dengue fever, which has claimed 71 lives so far and is straining the war-ravaged nation’s tattered health system, a government official said on Tuesday. Muntasir Mohamed Osman, a senior health ministry official, said there were 299 suspected cases of the mosquito-borne disease in the affected South Kordofan region in central Sudan. Most of the cases, which were arriving at hospitals in the rural and mountainous area, were at a terminal stage, leading to an unusually high death rate of almost 25 percent.

Angola Marburg outbreak near end
From health.am

Angola has not seen a new case of Marburg haemorrhagic fever for almost two weeks, officials said on Tuesday, suggesting the outbreak that killed more than 300 people is petering out - but they still urge caution. With the last confirmed case on July 9, emergency teams have been leaving Uige, the northern province which bore the brunt of the disease. But they say the outbreak in the Southern African country will not be officially over until 42 days after the last case, twice the maximum incubation period. “We really are moving towards the end,” said Fatoumata Binta Dialla, Angola representative for the United Nations World Health Organisation. “But we cannot say the outbreak is over until we have finished tracking down all the people who came into contact with the victims.”

Marburg toll in Angola revised downwards by WHO
From health.am

The World Health Organisation (WHO) on Thursday revised downwards the toll from the outbreak of Marburg Fever in Angola to 312 deaths among 351 cases. The U.N. agency reported in mid-June that there were 356 deaths among 422 cases of the Ebola-like disease, but spokesman Dick Thompson said that the new toll came after careful review of all cases and laboratory samples. “Initially there is a broad case definition to bring all people under observation and identify all contacts so people do not slip through the net,” said Thompson. “Now we have a more realistic sense of what is going on.”

U.S. vaccine works against Lassa fever in monkeys
From health.am

A genetically engineered virus may offer the first effective vaccine against Lassa fever, a sometimes deadly hemorrhagic fever common in West Africa, U.S. and Canadian scientists said on Monday. The vaccine successfully protected four monkeys against Lassa, a virus that sometimes causes high fever, internal bleeding and which kills at least 5,000 people a year. “This is the first vaccine platform shown to completely protect nonhuman primates from Lassa virus,” said Dr. Thomas Geisbert of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Frederick, Maryland.

Marburg orphans hundreds of Angolan children
From health.am

Angola’s deadly Marburg outbreak has left hundreds of children orphaned and traumatised after seeing dying parents rushed away or their homes destroyed in attempts to stem the spread of the deadly virus, according to the United Nations. At least 320 children under 16 have lost one or both parents to the Ebola-like outbreak in northern Uige province, UNICEF’s deputy country representative Akhil Iyer said on Wednesday. “There have been houses that have been burnt or destroyed, others locked up so the children have lost access to their home,” Iyer said.

Vaccines show promise for Marburg, Ebola viruses
From health.am

Canadian and U.S. scientists have developed vaccines that protect monkeys from the deadly Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever and Ebola viruses and show promise for humans, according to a news study published in the journal Nature Medicine on Sunday. It will take five or six years to complete the research to see if the experimental vaccines are safe and effective for people exposed to the contagious viruses, which are almost always fatal, said Steven Jones, one of the Canadian-based scientists who conducted the study.

Marburg fever death toll tops 300 in Angola—WHO
From health.am

Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever has killed more than 300 people in Angola, mainly through exposure to the deadly virus at home and at funerals, but the situation is improving, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Thursday. The United Nations agency said Angolan health officials had reported 337 cases since late last year, 311 of them fatal. The outbreak was not yet contained but deaths were being prevented by better awareness, which had resulted in Angolans bringing patients to hospital early, said Aphaluck Bhatiasevi,  WHO spokeswoman.

Angola Marburg outbreak not over, death toll up
From health.am

The World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Monday that Angola’s Marburg Fever outbreak was not over yet as the death toll from the disease climbed. “We’ve seen new cases in new municipalities that don’t have obvious links to earlier cases of Marburg. We are very concerned about the situation,” WHO spokesperson Aphaluck Bhatiasevi told Reuters by phone from northern Uige province, the epicentre of the pandemic. “We are trying to do as much tracing as possible. But some of the cases we have seen in the last 10 days don’t have a clear link to previous cases,” she said. “The outbreak is not over.”

Congo fears new Ebola outbreak after eight die
From health.am

Republic of Congo said on Thursday eight people had died over the past two weeks with symptoms similar to those suffered by victims of the Ebola virus, raising fears of a new outbreak of the disease. Health Minister Alphonse Gando said people should not panic but should avoid contact with suspected patients and dead bush animals, which are thought to transmit the virus to humans. “Since April 27, the health district of Etoumbi, in the Cuvette-Ouest region, has recorded seven deaths and three patients with clinical symptoms that make the Ebola virus a strong suspect as the cause of the deaths and the illness,” Gando said in a statement.

Marburg death toll 277 in Angola, more feared—WHO
From health.am

Twenty-two more people have died of the Marburg virus in Angola over the past week, taking the toll to 277, and more deaths are feared, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Friday. “The number of cases is continuing to rise slowly,” WHO spokesman Iain Simpson told journalists. “I wouldn’t say it is out of control but I wouldn’t say it is under control either… In fact we expect that there will be more cases,” he added.

Folklife News & Events: Homegrown Concert: Ukrainian American Bandura Master Julian Kytasty May 18 at noon
From https:

Join us for the American Folklife Center's Homegrown 2022 concert, starting May 18 at noon. Ukrainian American Bandura Master Julian Kytasty

Note: The videos won't appear until about noon on May 18, at which point they'll be at the link! If you visit the link before that, you can check out our blog...and subscribe!

Julian Kytasty was born in Detroit, Michigan, into a family of Ukrainian refugees who came to the United States after World War II. He is a third generation player of the bandura, a Ukrainian stringed instrument with similarities to the lute and the zither. He first learned the instrument from his father and grandfather, and from his great uncle Hryhory Kytasty, a renowned composer and conductor. In 1980 he moved to New York to be the music director of the New York Bandura Ensemble and began a career that has taken him all over the world. As a performer, recording artist, composer, teacher, and ensemble leader, he has redefined the possibilities of his instrument. His discography includes tributes to the bandura’s deep tradition (“Black Sea Winds”, “Songs of Truth”), innovative ensemble recordings (“Experimental Bandura Trio”), World Music collaborations (“Wu Man and Friends”), a duo with Free Improvisation master Derek Bailey, electroacoustic projects, and a recent recording of his own solo instrumental music (“Nights in Banduristan”). He has worked cross-culturally with such artists as Chinese pipa player Wu Man, klezmer revivalist Michael Alpert, and Mongolian master musician Battuvshin.

Julian Kytasty has composed music for theater, modern dance, and film, including an award-winning film score for the National Film Board of Canada’s feature documentary, “My Mother’s Village.” His work on Yara Arts Group’s “1917-2017” earned two New York Innovative Theatre Awards, for Best Original Score and Best Musical. In 1989-90 Julian Kytasty first toured Ukraine, performing over 100 concerts as a soloist and with a bandura ensemble. He has returned many times since, performing all over the country, as a solo artist, in Yara Arts Group theater projects, and in collaborations with Ukrainian artists. In September 2021, President Volodymyr Zelenskyy awarded Julian Kytasty the title “Honoured Artist of Ukraine” in a ceremony in New York City.

This concert is brought to you in collaboration with the Center for Traditional Music and Dance's program, “Beat of the Boroughs: NYC Online” and the Ukrainian Museum in New York City.

Along with Julian Kytasty's concert, you'll find an interview with him and some related links to explore...all at our blog Folklife Today.

Once again, the videos won't appear until about noon on May 18, at which point they'll be at the link! If you visit the link before that, you can check out our blog...and subscribe!

Click here for the premiere!


May News from the Library of Congress
From https:

News from the Library of Congress

Live! at the Library, May Heritage Months, NewA Concerts from the Library of CongressA and More


Folklife News & Events: Homegrown Concert: Herb Ohta Jr., 'Ukulele Virtuoso from Hawai'i May 4 Noon
From https:

Join us for the American Folklife Center's Homegrown 2022 concert, starting May 4 at noon. Herb Ohta Jr., 'Ukulele Virtuoso from Hawai'i

International recording artist Herb Ohta, Jr., is one of today’s most prolific 'ukulele masters. Influenced by Jazz, R&B, Latin and Brazilian music, as well as traditional Hawaiian sounds, he puts his stamp on Hawaiian music by pushing the limits of tone and technique on this beautiful instrument. The son of 'ukulele legend "Ohta-san," he started playing at the age of three, and began teaching at the age of nine. He now shares the music of Hawai'i and the beauty of the 'ukulele with people around the world, performing concerts and conducting instructional workshops. Herb’s recording debut was in 1990 on one of his father’s albums. Since then, he has appeared on over 50 recordings, with 15 Solo and 13 duet recordings to his credit. He has won seven NA HAkA<< Hanohano Awards and four Hawai'i Music Awards. He has issued three nationally distributed releases in Japan and one in Taiwan. He has co-authored two 'ukulele instructional books with GRAMMY Award winner Daniel Ho, which were released in Japan and the United States, and has published a songbook of his arrangements in Korea.

Along with Herb Ohta, Jr.'s concert, you'll find an interview with him and some related links to explore...all at our blog Folklife Today. The videos won't appear until about noon on May 4, at which point they'll be at the link!  If you visit the link before that, you can check out our blog...and subscribe!

Click here for the premiere!


April News from the Library of Congress
From https:

News from the Library of Congress

National Recording Registry Inducts Music from Alicia Keys, Ricky Martin, Journey and More in 2022

nrr20222

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden named 25 recordings as audio treasures worthy of preservation for all time based on their cultural, historical or aesthetic importance in the nationas recorded sound heritage.

Alicia Keysa debut album aSongs in A Minor,a Ricky Martinas aLivina La Vida Locaa and Journeyas aDonat Stop Believina are some of the unforgettable sounds of the nationas history and culture joining the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress. The 2022 class includes important inductions of hip-hop and Latin music, including recordings by Linda Ronstadt, A Tribe Called Quest, Wu-Tang Clan and Buena Vista Social Club.

Learn more about the 2022 National Recording Registry.



Folklife News & Events: Homegrown Concert: Kongero from Sweden April 20 Noon
From https:

Join us for the American Folklife Center's first Homegrown 2022 concert, starting April 20 at noon. Kongero: Swedish Folk'appella

Kongero is a Swedish vocal group, consisting of four women who sing folksongs: Lotta Andersson, Emma Björling, Sofia Hultqvist Kott, and Anna Wikénius. Since 2005, they have performed their polyphonic a cappella folk music (which they have dubbed Folk’appella) all over Europe, Asia, and the Americas, singing in concerts and leading workshops in traditional Swedish vocal music and vocal harmonies. Kongero’s repertoire consists of traditional and original songs and tunes. Traditionally, Swedish songs were sung solo by a woman, with Swedish mouth music most often performed solo by a man. Kongero add harmonies and arrangements created by the band members. Kongero’s music tells tales of life, with moving love songs, dramatic medieval ballads, witty ditties, and spirited dances, all sung in their native Swedish tongue. Kongero’s polyphonic music is characterized by tight harmonies, stirring rhythms, and the clarity of their beautiful voices, which bring traditional Swedish folksongs into modern times.

Along with Kongero's concert, you'll find an interview with the singers...all at our blog Folklife Today. The videos won't appear until about noon on April 20, at which point they'll be at the link!  If you visit the link before that, you can check out our blog...and subscribe!



Click here for the premiere!


March News from the Library of Congress
From https:

News from the Library of Congress

Women's History Month, Gershwin Prize Award & More

womenshistorymonth

Join the Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in commemorating and encouraging the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history.

Visit our joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: womenshistorymonth.gov



March News from the Library of Congress
From https:

News from the Library of Congress

Women's History Month, Gershwin Prize Award & More

womenshistorymonth

Join the Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in commemorating and encouraging the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history.

Visit our joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: womenshistorymonth.gov



Folklife News & Events: AFC Fellowships and Awards Deadline March 07
From loc.gov

The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress invites applications for three competitive awards in 2022. The awards support ethnographic fieldwork with occupational groups; work with ethnographic collection materials at the Library of Congress; and activities directly involving folk artists, such as apprenticeships, recording projects, or performances.

Archie Green Fellowships support new, original, independent field research into the culture and traditions of contemporary American workers and/or occupational groups.

The Gerald E. and Corinne L. Parsons Fund Award is offered to make the collections of primary ethnographic materials housed anywhere at the Library of Congress available for the needs and uses of those in the private sector.

The Henry Reed Fund Award supports activities directly involving folk artists.

Find information about each of these awards and application requirements at the link. The past recipients link on the menu at the top of the web page will also help provide a useful history each of these awards.

All three share the same deadline: March 7, 2022.

Click here for more information.


Folklife News & Events: AFC Fellowships and Awards Deadline March 07
From loc.gov

The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress invites applications for three competitive awards in 2022. The awards support ethnographic fieldwork with occupational groups; work with ethnographic collection materials at the Library of Congress; and activities directly involving folk artists, such as apprenticeships, recording projects, or performances.

Archie Green Fellowships support new, original, independent field research into the culture and traditions of contemporary American workers and/or occupational groups.

The Gerald E. and Corinne L. Parsons Fund Award is offered to make the collections of primary ethnographic materials housed anywhere at the Library of Congress available for the needs and uses of those in the private sector.

The Henry Reed Fund Award supports activities directly involving folk artists.

Find information about each of these awards and application requirements at the link. The past recipients link on the menu at the top of the web page will also help provide a useful history each of these awards.

All three share the same deadline: March 7, 2022.

Click here for more information.


February News from the Library of Congress
From https:

News from the Library of Congress

Black History Month, Coronavirus Web Archive Collection & More

bhm

The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of African Americans who struggled with adversity to achieve full citizenship in American society. Visit this joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: blackhistorymonth.gov


Programs Honor Black History Month at the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is holding several virtual events throughout February to share discoveries and stories around Black History Month. For visitors to the Libraryas Jefferson Building, the exhibition aRosa Parks: In Her Own Wordsa remains on view.

Learn more.


Folklife News & Events: AFC Fellowships and Awards Deadline March 07
From loc.gov

The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress invites applications for three competitive awards in 2022. The awards support ethnographic fieldwork with occupational groups; work with ethnographic collection materials at the Library of Congress; and activities directly involving folk artists, such as apprenticeships, recording projects, or performances.

Archie Green Fellowships support new, original, independent field research into the culture and traditions of contemporary American workers and/or occupational groups.

The Gerald E. and Corinne L. Parsons Fund Award is offered to make the collections of primary ethnographic materials housed anywhere at the Library of Congress available for the needs and uses of those in the private sector.

The Henry Reed Fund Award supports activities directly involving folk artists.

Find information about each of these awards and application requirements at the link. The past recipients link on the menu at the top of the web page will also help provide a useful history each of these awards.

All three share the same deadline: March 7, 2020.

Click here for more information.


January News from the Library of Congress
From https:

News from the Library of Congress

Lionel Richie, the Kitchen Sisters, New Online Collections & More


Nowas Your Chance: Join the Friends of Library
From https:

Thank you for subscribing to our email bulletin services! We value your interest in the Library’s programs and services and appreciate this opportunity to connect with you.

As you finalize your year-end giving plans, please take one more opportunity to connect and consider a tax-deductible donation to the Library of Congress. You will become an inaugural member of Friends of the Library of Congress.

As a Friend of the Library, you will join a growing philanthropic community that helps protect, preserve and diversify our nation's cultural record. And you will have unique, member-only opportunities to engage virtually and in person with the collections, curators and other Friends during the coming New Year.

If you’ve joined our new Friends program, thank you very much! And if you haven’t, here’s how you can learn more about Friends of the Library of Congress and join today!

Friends of the Library of Congress logo

 


December News from the Library of Congress
From https:

News from the Library of Congress

2021 National Film Registry, Latinos in Public Media & More


November News from the Library of Congress
From https:

News from the Library of Congress

Native American Heritage Month, Ken Burns Prize, & More!


Join the Friends of the Library of Congress
From https:

For more than 200 years, the Library of Congress has collected, preserved and protected our national record for your use now. To write a book, to start a business, to research your family genealogy, to understand our shared history. The Library is yours. 

And, there is no time like now to join the Friends of the Library of Congress to help preserve this country’s enduring culture and spirit for generations to come. Join now and become an inaugural member. 

As an inaugural member, you will have distinctive opportunities to explore the marvels of the Library’s collections and enjoy engaging with our curators and archivists and librarians. 

And, as a part of this important philanthropic community, you will leave a lasting mark on the nation’s Library. From helping to diversify the Library’s collections to supporting public exhibitions and programs, the impact of becoming a Friend will last for generations.  

Learn more about Friends of the Library of Congress and the benefits of becoming a member.

And join us as an inaugural member today!

Friends of the Library of Congress logo


Folklife News & Events: Two Great Mexican Concerts September 29 Noon and 12:30 Eastern
From https:

Please Join us on September 29 at noon and 12:30 Eastern time for two half-hour concerts in the Homegrown at Home series: 

At Noon, Mamselle Ruiz: Mexican Sones from Montreal, Canada

Mamselle Ruiz is Mexican-born singer and guitarist living in French-speaking Montreal. You might expect “Mamselle,” which is colloquial French for “Miss,” to be a stage name, but in fact it’s her real first name, bestowed when she was born in Mexico city. Mamselle was raised on all kinds of Mexican music, and she includes traditional Mexican folksongs such as “La Bruja” and “La Llorona” in a diverse repertoire that also includes Son Huasteco classics along with Latin cover songs and her own compositions. Mamselle built her reputation as a singer in Mexico City and the Mexican Caribbean town of Tulum until a romance and a singing engagement with Cirque du Soleil brought her to Canada in 2009. She was soon winning awards from Radio Canada and the Vue sur la relève festival, and a prestigious artist’s residency at Place des Arts. Mamselle Ruiz has played over 500 concerts, in Québec and throughout Canada, as well as in Mexico, and has performed at festivals such as the Montreal International Jazz Festival and in venues such as Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. She has shared stages with Lila Downs, Elvis Crespo, and Bia. In 2021, she showcased at Folk Alliance International. For her Homegrown concert Mamselle Ruiz will concentrate on the traditional side of her repertoire, bringing traditional songs and Son Huasteco standards from several regions of Mexico to the Homegrown at Home series.

At 12:30, Cambalache: Mexican American Son Jarocho from California

Cambalache, named for a Spanish word that means “exchange,” is a Chicano-Jarocho group based in East Los Angeles. Founded in 2007 and led by César Castro (sonero, maestro and luthier from Veracruz, Mexico), Cambalache plays and promotes traditional son jarocho through performance, music workshops, and educational demonstrations. Son jarocho comes from Veracruz, Mexico, on the gulf coast, a cultural region shaped by Indigenous, African, and Spanish culture. In the spirit of the fandango, a traditional celebration of music and dance, Cambalache engages its audience through participatory performances. In 2010, Cambalache organized an important fundraiser for victims of Hurricane Karl in Veracruz, thus strengthening decades of social and cultural exchange of the Chicano-Jarocho network. Cambalache’s educational mission involves demonstrations from elementary school to universities, museums and music festivals. The music of Cambalache was featured on August 7, 2011 on NPR’s All Things Considered, whose host commented: “Son Jarocho has been popular in Los Angeles, going back to the 1950s with Ritchie Valens, then Los Lobos. Today, it’s a part of the regular soundtrack of Latino music in East L.A.” Castro and fellow Cambalache member Xochi Flores appeared in the 2014 Homegrown concert of Son Jarocho Master Musicians.

Cambalache, vocablo que significa intercambio, es un grupo Chicano-Jarocho con base en el Este de Los Angeles; fundado en 2007 y lidereado por César Castro (maestro sonero y laudero jarocho de Veracruz, México). Cambalache promociona el son jarocho de estilo tradicional a través de conciertos, presentaciones y talleres didácticos. Esta música es popular en Veracruz y la costa del Golfo, una región cultural formada por la cultura indígena, africana y al igual que la cultural española. Con el espíritu del fandango, una celebración tradicional basada en la música y el baile, Cambalache invita al público a participar con ellos en sus presentaciones. En 2010, Cambalache organizó un concierto para recaudar fondos para las víctimas del huracán Karl en Veracruz, fortaleciendo asi décadas de intercambio socio-cultural entre los chicanos y jarochos. El objetivo educativo de Cambalache incluye variadas presentaciones que van desde escuelas primarias hasta universidades, museos y festivales de música, entre otras tantas más. Cambalache salió al aire en la Radio Pública Nacional (NPR) el 7 de agosto de 2011 en el programa “All Things Considered” en donde se escuchó una frase que dice: “El son jarocho ha sido popular en Los Angeles, recordemos los años 50 con Ritchie Valens, después Los Lobos. Hoy, esto es parte del repertorio latino de la música en el Este de Los Angeles.” César Castro y Xochi Flores de Cambalache se presentaron en el concierto Homegrown 2014, “Son Jarocho Master Musicians.”

At the link, you'll find the Folklife Concerts page. Look down the list of links for each concert; selecting that concert page will get you all the ways to watch!

Click here for the Folklife Concerts Page.


Folklife News & Events: Two Great Mexican Concerts September 29 Noon and 12:30 Eastern
From https:

Please Join us on September 29 at noon and 12:30 Eastern time for two half-hour concerts in the Homegrown at Home series: 

At Noon, Mamselle Ruiz: Mexican Sones from Montreal, Canada

Mamselle Ruiz is Mexican-born singer and guitarist living in French-speaking Montreal. You might expect “Mamselle,” which is colloquial French for “Miss,” to be a stage name, but in fact it’s her real first name, bestowed when she was born in Mexico city. Mamselle was raised on all kinds of Mexican music, and she includes traditional Mexican folksongs such as “La Bruja” and “La Llorona” in a diverse repertoire that also includes Son Huasteco classics along with Latin cover songs and her own compositions. Mamselle built her reputation as a singer in Mexico City and the Mexican Caribbean town of Tulum until a romance and a singing engagement with Cirque du Soleil brought her to Canada in 2009. She was soon winning awards from Radio Canada and the Vue sur la relève festival, and a prestigious artist’s residency at Place des Arts. Mamselle Ruiz has played over 500 concerts, in Québec and throughout Canada, as well as in Mexico, and has performed at festivals such as the Montreal International Jazz Festival and in venues such as Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. She has shared stages with Lila Downs, Elvis Crespo, and Bia. In 2021, she showcased at Folk Alliance International. For her Homegrown concert Mamselle Ruiz will concentrate on the traditional side of her repertoire, bringing traditional songs and Son Huasteco standards from several regions of Mexico to the Homegrown at Home series.

At 12:30, Cambalache: Mexican American Son Jarocho from California

Cambalache, named for a Spanish word that means “exchange,” is a Chicano-Jarocho group based in East Los Angeles. Founded in 2007 and led by César Castro (sonero, maestro and luthier from Veracruz, Mexico), Cambalache plays and promotes traditional son jarocho through performance, music workshops, and educational demonstrations. Son jarocho comes from Veracruz, Mexico, on the gulf coast, a cultural region shaped by Indigenous, African, and Spanish culture. In the spirit of the fandango, a traditional celebration of music and dance, Cambalache engages its audience through participatory performances. In 2010, Cambalache organized an important fundraiser for victims of Hurricane Karl in Veracruz, thus strengthening decades of social and cultural exchange of the Chicano-Jarocho network. Cambalache’s educational mission involves demonstrations from elementary school to universities, museums and music festivals. The music of Cambalache was featured on August 7, 2011 on NPR’s All Things Considered, whose host commented: “Son Jarocho has been popular in Los Angeles, going back to the 1950s with Ritchie Valens, then Los Lobos. Today, it’s a part of the regular soundtrack of Latino music in East L.A.” Castro and fellow Cambalache member Xochi Flores appeared in the 2014 Homegrown concert of Son Jarocho Master Musicians.

Cambalache, vocablo que significa intercambio, es un grupo Chicano-Jarocho con base en el Este de Los Angeles; fundado en 2007 y lidereado por César Castro (maestro sonero y laudero jarocho de Veracruz, México). Cambalache promociona el son jarocho de estilo tradicional a través de conciertos, presentaciones y talleres didácticos. Esta música es popular en Veracruz y la costa del Golfo, una región cultural formada por la cultura indígena, africana y al igual que la cultural española. Con el espíritu del fandango, una celebración tradicional basada en la música y el baile, Cambalache invita al público a participar con ellos en sus presentaciones. En 2010, Cambalache organizó un concierto para recaudar fondos para las víctimas del huracán Karl en Veracruz, fortaleciendo asi décadas de intercambio socio-cultural entre los chicanos y jarochos. El objetivo educativo de Cambalache incluye variadas presentaciones que van desde escuelas primarias hasta universidades, museos y festivales de música, entre otras tantas más. Cambalache salió al aire en la Radio Pública Nacional (NPR) el 7 de agosto de 2011 en el programa “All Things Considered” en donde se escuchó una frase que dice: “El son jarocho ha sido popular en Los Angeles, recordemos los años 50 con Ritchie Valens, después Los Lobos. Hoy, esto es parte del repertorio latino de la música en el Este de Los Angeles.” César Castro y Xochi Flores de Cambalache se presentaron en el concierto Homegrown 2014, “Son Jarocho Master Musicians.”

At the link, you'll find the Folklife Concerts page. Look down the list of links for each concert; selecting that concert page will get you all the ways to watch!

Click here for the Folklife Concerts Page.


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